Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Mass Rocket Stove/Heater, Part 1

10/26/2011 - 4th Day - Afternoon– Greetings y’all.  Fall preps continue here at the ranch.  I told you I'd post a posting about the mass rocket heater/stove, and even though we aren't done, here is that posting...


Kelly Sustaire started out by dry stacking the stove in a very general way, and starting it up to make sure it would draw well based on the dimensions he had in mind.  The front hole is the "fire box", the back hole (covered by the pipe) is the combustion chamber guts.  The fire box is also the air intake, so what you want is a great draft that pulls the flame horizontally and then up the combustion chamber.  After the dry stack, we moved the project into the buggy barn.



The actual structure is built on an area leveled by sand.  As you can see, Kelly radically departed from his dry stack plans.  I suppose it is because he actually started reading the book, but it is hard to get a straight answer from Kelly.  The wider "star" portion is reportedly supposed to be to support the barrel area, but we later learned that this didn't make any sense at all, and it was probably superfluous.  It will still work.


Now Kelly mixes a kind of cob/mortar mix from the clay off of our land.  This is probably also unnecessary, although it will keep the structure more sound as the cob goes on later.


Here you can see the mortar area between the layers going on.


This video shows Kelly spreading some homemade mortar...


Now the second row of brick is placed...



Kelly carefully keeps the whole structure square and level...


Kelly gets close to finishing the second course...


The second course is done...


The third course actually starts the framing of the fire box and air tunnel...


The heater begins to take shape... 


Kelly continues mortaring, leveling, etc.  You can see now that the main fire channel is formed....


This project is fairly inexpensive because we bought used fire brick, and the clay comes from the land.  We brought in a load of sand for the mixture.


The fire channel is finished...


Now the final course, which frames in the firebox and the opening to the combustion chamber...


On Kelly's right you can see the opening to the combustion chamber...


We set the combustion chamber pipe (an old, used section of 8 inch triple wall) to show how it will go...


Some mortar is placed around the joint, and eventually all of this will get covered with COB.

This video shows the guts of the stove/heater and explains how it works...


This video shows our first attempt to light the stove.... This is easy, but there was a learning curve...


Here you can see the fire burning well.  The fire burns horizontally and is sucked up the combustion tube so no smoke enters the dwelling.


Kelly breaks scrap wood for the fire...


This video shows the stove working as advertised.  Now it is time to start adding COB...


Here is the COB mixture being mixed.  It is comprised of clay from our land, sand, and straw.  The exact mixture has to be arrived by testing, so get the book by Ianto Evans and do the tests to figure out what you need to do.  The mixture is mixed in the tarp, and can be pulled and stomped on to thoroughly mix the stuff...


Here, the tarp is folded over and the mixer (Kelly) stomps it real good and dances on it to make it mix up well...


Here you can see the COB mixture being applied to the stove.  Stay tuned to see how this turns out.  The holes are poked in to make sure the next layer will adhere well.  These holes will not be evident in the finished product.


So here is how we stand today.  We probably will not be finished until next week some time, but I'll keep you up to date (Lord willing).  The back section here is where the pipe will take the heat through the bench which is yet to be added.

That's it for Part 1.  Stay tuned for Part 2 hopefully next week.

I am your servant in Christ Jesus,

Michael Bunker

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I really want to build one myself. Does it work as it is said too? Does it use lots of wood ?

Anonymous said...

rocket heater???

just use old and tried massonry heater.

here how it looks like in Eastern Europe

http://www.kamin-spb.ru/SPB/Kamin-pech/Pechi/pechi%20Ot/9/pech%20ot%209.htm

Michael Bunker said...

Anonymous,

That would cost $10,000. Cheap? Made from readily available materials? NO. Open your mind a bit. Sometimes a different theory actually works.

Pardon my terse response, but it comes from the third question mark. Condescension doesn't work around me very well.

Michael

Michael Bunker said...

The whole purpose of the rocket heater is:

A. It is made from used materials, or materials that can be found or manufactured from what is already on your land.

B. It is MORE EFFICIENT than traditional wood stoves. It is not JUST a mass heater that heats up mass. IT actually combusts the smoke, making it over 90% efficient.

It's not really a viable comment to suggest something that does neither of these things. Putting mass around a traditional heater, and spending thousands of dollars on materials is NOT a solution.

MB

jmrock said...

Any new progress on this RMH? I too am about to build one- more for the sake of experimentation due to residing in a 24' camper until spring/ early summer. I do like the build though. I also really like the green houses.

Daniel said...

Hello, unfortunately, the video are not playing. Thank you for posting on this interesting subject.

kev kevin said...

It is an inspirational post.The pictures are also nice.Keep up sharing such nice posts.Slow combustion heaters